Tag Archives: Yorkshire

The real Yorkshire tart (and a bit of magic!)

Curd cheese and whey

Overall, it’s has been a pretty good start to the New Year. We finally managed to buy our house after nine months of grueling negotiation and waiting. Work has been pretty kind so far allowing me to stick to a relatively ‘normal’ schedule (read no hundred hour weeks yet – touching wood, of course!). And I managed to run for an unprecedented forty minutes on the treadmill yesterday!

Humble beginnings

But I have to admit that baking has been a bit on the back burner these last two weeks. Partially due to house-related tasks, but also because it’s actually taken me this long to clear my home of the sweet offerings remaining from Christmas. By “clear”, of course I mean “eat”. So even looking at a stick of butter has just been a bit too much lately.

Bubble, bubble...

Too much, that is, until today. Spurred on by the good tidings of 2013 and the suggestion of a dear friend from the UK, I have decided to take the plunge, to finally come to grips with my namesake: The Yorkshire Tart.

Have strainer, will strain

A traditional Yorkshire tart is essentially a baked cheesecake. Crisp pastry gives way to a creamy filling, with hints of nutmeg and lemon, and dotted with plump currants. Curd cheese is needed here and so I began this escapade by Google-ing sellers of curd cheese in the New York area. Rapidly realizing I would be down twenty dollars if I went the ready-made route, I quickly discovered that it’s actually pretty simple (and ridiculously economical) to make your own. In fact, you only need two ingredients: milk and lemon juice.

2013-01-13_16-20-46_573So out I went to purchase two pints of full fat milk and a nice organic lemon (the zest is also needed for the tart). First, I needed to bring the milk to a gentle simmer. I’m slightly embarrassed to admit that I actually found this the hardest part. Making sure the milk is hot enough without scorching is a bit of a challenge. I decided to take the milk off the heat when I could just see small bubbles rising under the ‘skin’ of the milk. Once simmering to my satisfaction, I added four tablespoons of lemon juice and – hey presto – lots of satisfying curdling happened. Take that, Little Miss Muffet!

Magic

After an hour or so of cooling, I drained the curds through some cheesecloth over a bowl and, with a bit of amateur engineering, rigged up a system by which I could continue to drain the curds in the fridge overnight. The next day I had a good amount of curd, which really did taste just like cheesecake, and a pint of two of liquid whey, which can apparently be used just like buttermilk in scones, pancakes or soda bread.

Making the tart itself is very simple and I promise that you will get an extra kick out of eating it knowing that you performed a little bit of cooking magic along the way!

Oven ready

A simple slice

Yorkshire Tart

Adapted from a recipe by the Hairy Bikers

Make the curd cheese the day before:

To make the curd cheese, heat 2 pints/1.2 liters whole milk in a saucepan over a low heat until it very gentle simmers. Remove from the heat and pour in 4 tbsp lemon juice, stirring twice as the curds form. Set aside and cool for 1 hour.

Line a sieve with muslin and place over a large bowl (if you’re using a bouillon strainer like me, you may fine it helpful to balance the bottom of the strainer on an upturned ramekin placed in the bottom of the bowl). Pour the curds and whey into the sieve and allow to drain in the fridge overnight.

The next day, make the tart:

To make the pastry, add 2 tsp caster sugar to 6 oz/175 g all-purpose flour, and rub in 3.5 oz/100 g cold butter. Combine to a dough with 1 beaten egg. Roll out and line a pie dish, pricking the bottom with a fork. The filling will sit quite low in the pie, and so you may wish to trim off any excess pastry to the inner edge of the dish.

Preheat the oven to 180 C/350 F/Gas 4.

Cream 2.5 oz/65 g caster sugar and 2.5 oz/65 g butter together until light and fluffy. Gradually beat in 1 beaten egg. Stir in all of your curd cheese, the zest of half a lemon, 1/4 tsp nutmeg, and 2 oz/50 g currants. Mix well until combined.

Spoon the curd into the pastry base and spread to the sides. Bake for 30-35 mins, or until the pastry is golden brown and the filling sets. When I baked my tart, the filling wasn’t browned after 35 mins. It is normal to see Yorkshire tarts that are both browned and pale, so don’t worry if yours looks like either of these.

Leave to cool for at least 30 mins before serving. It is best enjoyed at room temperature or chilled.

TYT.

Remember, remember

Remember, remember the fifth of November; Gunpowder, treason and plot;

I see no reason for gunpowder treason; To ever be forgot!

Today is my favorite holiday. It didn’t used to be, but it has been ever since I’ve lived in the US. When I first moved here, I rather naively thought everyone celebrated the thwarting of Guy Fawkes’ famous attempt to blow up Parliament, intending to assassinate King James in the process, and restore Catholic rule in England. You can imagine my disappointment when November 5th rolled around and I realized that this was, in fact, a very English event.

It’s not that I don’t appreciate the holidays I’ve gained since moving here. Indeed, there are enough fireworks on July 4th to hold someone over for the entire year, and who wouldn’t want an extra feast a mere month before Christmas?

But there’s something wonderfully sinister about “Guy Fawkes Night” (also simply referred to as ”Bonfire Night”). I have to admit that I’d never really thought about how sinister until an American friend exclaimed, “But don’t you guys burn effigies?!” To which I could only reply, “Well, yes…in fact we do.”

But it’s just so much fun! I’ll always remember the week leading up to Bonfire Night at school: the emergence of the Horrible Histories books and the ensuing arguments about what being hung, drawn and quartered really entails. The prizes for the best class “Guy”, eternally fated to a fiery death on the bonfire come nightfall. The wildlife officers reminding us to check our wood-piles for unfortunate hedgehogs before setting them alight.

And then there are the fireworks, intended to signify what Parliament would have looked like if Mr Fawkes had succeeded. Fizzers! Bangers! Whoppers! Spinners (known as Catherine wheels which is also a rather morbid reference)! There are often rivalries as to who can bring the biggest, the loudest, the screechiest. Those requiring a safe distance of 40 ft are regularly set off in tiny English back gardens, to the sound of joyful “Oooos” and “Aaaas” of friends and family, gathering around the bonfire for warmth, munching on pie ‘n’ mushy peas, toffee apples, and parkin. All the while, kids excitedly write their names in the air with sparklers.

The food associated with Bonfire Night is hearty and warming, designed to keep you going for a good few hours out in the cold. One particular speciality is associated directly with Yorkshire, and my hometown of Leeds in particular: the aforementioned parkin. Imagine gingerbread, but made with oatmeal, black treacle and the burnt sugary undertones of golden syrup, wrapped tightly for a few days before being eaten so as to allow the flavors to develop and mature. No one would dream of eating fresh parkin.

Parkin is guaranteed to sustain you through even the coldest Bonfire Night celebrations (like the ones I remember in my grandparent’s garden, pictured below). Even better, any leftovers last for ages!

Yorkshire Parkin

Adapted from a recipe by BBC GoodFood

Preheat the oven to 140°C/280°F/Gas Mark 1. Grease and line a 8 inch square cake tin.

In a pan, melt 4 oz butter with 4 oz soft dark brown sugar, 2 oz black treacle, and 7 oz golden syrup. Use a gentle heat and don’t let the mixture get too hot or bubble.

Once melted, remove from the heat and allow to cool slightly.

In a large mixing bowl, sift 4 oz all purpose flour, 1/2 tsp baking powder, and a pinch of salt. Add 8 oz medium oatmeal, 2 tsp ground ginger, and 1 tsp pumpkin spice.

Make a well in the center and gradually pour in the melted butter mixture and fold together.

Beat two eggs with 1 tbsp milk and add to the mixture. Stir to combine.

Pour into the baking tin and bake for 1 hour. Parkin can become dry easily so keep an eye on it. I baked mine for 1 hour 15 mins and I think it was a little too long.

Remove from the oven and let sit for 20 mins. Then turn out onto a cooling rack.

When cool, wrap tightly in parchment paper and leave in a cake tin for at least one day (and up to a week!) so the flavors become richer and deeper, and so it develops a moist, sticky texture. Yum!

TYT.

The philosophy of TYT

Hello and welcome to TheYorkshireTart!

This blog was born mainly out of my need to stay connected with my northern-English roots now that I have traveled across the pond. But it represents much more than that. It is also a celebration of my new home. The outstanding array of produce on offer at the local Greenmarkets in NY and farmer’s markets in NJ would be enough to make even a non-foodie excited about what might be for dinner. But for me over the last two years they have represented a sanctuary among what has often felt like chaos, and a resource for excellent food and culinary inspiration that was certainly never available to me while I was growing up in the suburbs of Leeds.

So my goal in the coming months is to reconcile these two aspects of my life that are so important to me, and the primary medium I will choose to do this with is: the tart. What is it about tarts, you ask, that makes them so pleasing? Is it the perfect filling to crust ratio? The fact that they can easily be as savory as they are sweet? The feeling you experience as you glide your fork first through the pillowy soft interior following by the crisp crack of the crust? Whatever it is, I get excited about it!

That said, I have rarely made a tart over the past two years, and a visit to my grandma’s house back in England would often obviate the need for me to make one when I still lived there. So this will be an adventure we both shall share, a rediscovery of the tastes and textures of my homeland, and new encounters with the wonderful food and produce of my new home. I am also excited to play a role in introducing northern-English food to a broader audience, in all is comforting glory. I hope that you will enjoy the journey as much as I’m sure I will and I certainly promise some new and delicious food along the way!

TYT.